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20121205
20121205
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the rights of disabled americans including veterans who may travel the country such as china or russia or mali or any other country that may choose to adopt this treaty. if the senate desires to protect rights of disabled americans who travel abroad, the senate would do better to encourage other nations to model their own reforms, their own internal legal structures after the americans with disabilities act, which 20 years after its passage still send a message that disabled americans will always have fair access to housing, employment and education in this nation. i've mentioned a few things to treaty does not do. i like to few things to treaty does do that cause me some concern. article xxxiv establishes a committee with the rights of persons with disabilities. this committee will establish its own rules of procedure and parties to the treaty are required to submit reports every four years. in general, u.n. human rights treaty committees have made demands the state parties that fall well outside of the legal, social, economic and cultural traditions and norms of state parties. someti
in medical equipment to russia in 2011, but we face strong competition from china, which increased its share of the russian market in each of the last ten years. mr. president, we don't shy away from strong competition, but we want that competition to be able to be played out on an even playing field. and as long as we don't have normal permanent trade relations with russia, we're disadvantaging ourselves. it simply doesn't make sense. russia has agreed he, since joining the w.t.o., russia agreed to reduce average tariffs on medical equipment to 4.3% and to cut its top tariffs from 15% down to 7%. as it stands now, that is a benefit that china will get, and we will not. it simply doesn't make sense to anybody. to grant russia pntr status requires us to repeal the 1974 jackson-vanik amendment. a lot of our staff members, i hasten to say, were not even born back when jackson-vanik was put in place. and many of our colleagues and a lot of our staff have studied the soviet union but have never really experienced that period of time, and what we're living with is a complete and total relic of a b
the treaty including china and russia. the treaty is modelled after existing u.s. law. former senator bob dole is 89 years old. he just got out of the hospital yesterday. and today he came to the senate floor in a wheelchair to support the treaty. eight republicans and two independents voted for the treaty including john mccain. but it wasn't enough. the treaty failed 61-38. >> it was solid then. he means it. and i think the organizing around it is so important. the labor movement, consumer groups, women's groups. >> i'm joined by a columnist for the nation magazine and howard fineman, msnbc political analyst. great to have you with us. howard, you first. when bob dole comes to the senate and he can't move people, where is the common sense? >> the senate is lost. that's the way i would put it. bob dole, one of the most revered figures. he's almost literally on his death bed a week or two ago. who summoned the courage to come to the senate to be the conscious on something he championed in 1990. this was senator bob dole, a republican. president george h. bush, republican. dick thorneberg,
rights violators wherever they might be, whether in russia or syria or sudan or north korea or china or any other country. in other words, the senate committee-approved bill wisely adopted a global magnitsky standard. the reasoning for this is sound. because while the mechanism of u.s. visa denial for human rights violators was inspired by a single case in a single nation, the principles that it seeks to advance are universal. this bipartisan committee bill, unlike the house-passed version of the magnitsky act that we will soon vote on, does not single out russian human rights violators for visa denial but would apply the visa denial mechanism to people from any country who violate important human rights standards. the united states should be clear and firm in its commitment to protecting human rights. wherever the violation occur. and to holding those who violate those rights accountable to the best of our ability. including denying them visas to come to our country. human rights do not end at the borders of russia and anyone who violates those standards as so many did so blatantly
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)